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Looking back at the first year of the school board majority

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How well do you think the new and somewhat fractured majority on the Wake County school board performed this past school year?

As noted in today's article, this past year saw a lot of fire and brimstone on the issue of student assignment and school diversity. While the former majority members say they wish they could have done more, they're pleased overall with what they did accomplish on student assignment and other issues.

“We’ve been doing some good things," said school board member Chris Malone. "We’re moving forward. We’re trying to get student assignment worked out.

While we’re not as far as we’d want to be, we’re moving forward. It’s incontrovertible that we’ve got more people going to school closer to where they live.”

Malone, board member John Tedesco and board chairman Ron Margiotta are pointing to a lengthy list of accomplishments they feel have been overshadowed by the controversy over ending the diversity policy.

In addition to changing the student assignment policy and making some nodes changes, they point to a list of other actions such as:
* New middle school math placement guidelines.
* Changing the zero-tolerance discipline policies.
* Ending Wacky Wednesdays while still having teachers find the time for professional learning teams;
* Essentially ending mandatory year-round schools;
* Abandoning Forest Ridge High for the new Rolesville High;
* New partnership to allow Knightdale High students to take AP courses at Green Hope High.

“We’ve made some substantial changes," Tedesco said. "We’re bringing to light issues people weren’t talking about.”

Board member Kevin Hill was far more neutral about how the past year went.

“It’s been an interesting year," HIll said. "It’s been a busy year. We’ve had a great deal on our part to address."

Tedesco and Margiotta say that, in hindsight, there may have some things they could have done differently.

Tedesco says they probably shouldn’t have tried to get as much public input in the initial development of the zone model. He says they should have considered doing it like prior boards when the assignment plan was developed by staff behind closed doors and then presented as a finished product to the public for comment.

Since the zone plan was still under development, Tedesco said people were picking apart some items or not understanding how some things would work. He said people didn't understand that the plan would have been phased in over time, had grandfathering and would have allowed more options for Southeast Raleigh students to apply to schools outside their zone to reduce the possibility of high poverty schools.

“There were a lot of parts in the plan that were misunderstood because it wasn’t finalized yet," Tedesco said.

Margiotta said it was a mistake to not have quickly revised the student assignment policy. The original plan, before bowing to public complaints about the lack of notice in the Dec. 1 meeting agenda, had been to adopt the changes last December.

Margiotta said that the several months it took to adopt the policy changes gave time for the opposition to organize.

“I didn’t expect the kind of problems we had with the assignment plan," Margiotta said. "I expected controversy but not the amount of controversy we had. The problem is we dragged out the policy.”

In the end, Margiotta said he's not dwelling on what could have been done differently.

"What’s done is done," Margiotta said. "We have to live with it and move forward. I’m disappointed that the assignment process isn’t moving forward but I’m hoping we can bring that back.”

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Reminds me of a political

Reminds me of a political cartoon I once saw about Bush. He was drawing a pro/con table about his presidency, said: "Cons; war, debt, economy. Pros; ...Dodged that shoe!"

The only thing these snake oil salesmen regret is not being able to make the sale before they split town.

You remind me of a cartoon I saw once

this guy, who is a follower, not a leader, keeps popping up out of the sewer with poop running off his head and ...

ditto

Beat me to the post.  These two guys are incredulous.

Hmmm....

It appears that someone doesn't understand the definition of "incredulous."

ROFL....I thought that same

ROFL....I thought that same thing! ;)

Abandon MYR?

How has MYR been abandoned?  The Leesville schools and Mills Park elementary were converted to Traditional.  Mills Park Middle was opened on a traditional schedule.  Where has the MYR abandonment taken place in the rest of the county?

YRS

YRS were started to save construction dollars at a time when the BOC's low tax policy was causing WCPSS to fall behind the demand for permanent new seats - that was a good policy call. On paper YRS kept the 2006 bond authorization from exceding the sticker-shock $1B barrier. Even Tony Gurley supported YRS.... before he didn't support them.

The BOE underestimated parent response, particularly for the least desireable tracks. Law suits or not, some tracks collapsed (it would be useful to know where and how many). It is unclear if the hoped for savings ever materialized.

Now YRS have become an icon, a trophy of war, and it has become impossible to discuss them rationally. The opportunity to make YRS a positive force is ignoreed in easing massive school personnel layoffs. I can only guess its more satisfying fighting a war and " killing the messenger" than constructively addressing an issue. Besides what would the WCSA supporters and donors think?

Our dishwasher just broke down. We didn't throw it away, we had it fixed. Similarly, we need to fix YRS. Enriching course content was successful for difficult to fill inner-city schools . I've suggested it for YRS. Zero reponse.

The substantial intellectual energy among Wake citizens, including the BOE is devoted to reversing diversity, reversing YRS and stopping "foced busing" (deceptively named but and never defined). Neighborhood schools are defined as the new trophy of war - with complete indifference as to the consequences.

It has gotten to the point where even TKH and Thomas Goldsmith in today's N&O note the potential for resegragation, i.e. the latest move for shipping low-income minorities from affluent North Raleigh to their low income neighborhoods. (If it walks like a duck, looks like a duck..) Or was it just a political ploy to pressure the key swing vote?

In the meantime, there appears to be little energy left to plan for the loss of about 2,000 WCPSS personnel. The BOE chair, probably after coordination with the BOC chair, requests no increase in the County contribution.. (note: Tony has Ron on his speed dial and has contacted him even in the midst of BOC meetings.)

Our dishwasher just broke

Our dishwasher just broke down. We didn't throw it away, we had it fixed.

Ours too.  I kicked it to the curb. Replaced it with beauty. Wife could not be happier. Enough said.

The BOE underestimated

The BOE underestimated parent response, particularly for the least desireable tracks. Law suits or not, some tracks collapsed (it would be useful to know where and how many). It is unclear if the hoped for savings ever materialized.

Now YRS have become an icon, a trophy of war, and it has become impossible to discuss them rationally. The opportunity to make YRS a positive force is ignoreed in easing massive school personnel layoffs. I can only guess its more satisfying fighting a war and " killing the messenger" than constructively addressing an issue. Besides what would the WCSA supporters and donors think?

Our dishwasher just broke down. We didn't throw it away, we had it fixed. Similarly, we need to fix YRS. Enriching course content was successful for difficult to fill inner-city schools . I've suggested it for YRS. Zero reponse.

The substantial intellectual energy among Wake citizens, including the BOE is devoted to reversing diversity, reversing YRS and stopping "foced busing" (deceptively named but and never defined). Neighborhood schools are defined as the new trophy of war - with complete indifference as to the consequences.

First of all, WSCA has never been against YR schools.  I can't think of a single person I've ever met who is against YR schools.  We are against mandatory year round.  YR schools were a positive force when they were voluntary.  When parents wanted to be there and when they were able to judge for themselves whether or not the positives of YR outweighed the negatives for their families. 

How do you suggest that YRs be used to avoid massive layoffs?  Is this for next year? Or are you talking about in general we can spend less money on school construction if we use MYR?  

As for enriching course content at YRs.  What do you mean by this?  At this point, YR MS don't have as many electives available as their traditional counterparts, not all ES kids get their specials or AG when they should because the teacher is tracked out, and MS kids have to be on certain tracks to get into advanced math.  Are you talking about bringing YR schools up to the same standards as traditional schools?  Or are you suggesting they be made into mini program magnets with special offerings?  Do you understand the implications of doing that?  Not just financial implications, but what effect it has on traditional, non-magnet schools?

It has already been suggested that we look at whether or not some current magnets can be converted to YR.  I think there are a few that could.  Do you support that?
 

???

MYR was never started in Wake county - there was a lawsuit to prevent it that delayed it for a couple years and after winning that lawsuit the BoE decided not to implement it after all.  You can't really abandon a policy that was never started....

MYR was never started?

Never started?  Bull shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Tell that to the 1,000's of children caught up in it.

Do you know what the "M"

Do you know what the "M" stands for in MYR?

Since every kid has an opt-out choice, the "M" wasn't a part of the YR conversion.

Bull Dung is flowing out of your ears again

Tell all the children whose parents bought homes where they did, based on a school they wanted their children to attend, who were told either switch calendars or you can go 10 times further out or to a Title 1 school that there was/is no "M" in MYR!

The "M" was placed there from day one and for the many of us who could not move at that time, and did not want the options because it wasn't in the best interest of our kids, the freakin' "M" is still there and will continue to be UNTIL this board has the nuggets to fix it. They haven't ended MYR and that is a lie! For the 1,000's of us still stuck with it, it never ends. Every freakin' day school is in session is an "M" day in our worlds!

Since you can't relate, do you know what FUAYNMIMYR means? Work on that a while.

FSandYou

Hey FSandYou. Whats up with all of the scatological references?

"keeps popping up out of the sewer with poop running off his head and ..."
"Never started?  Bull shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh"
"Bull Dung is flowing out of your ears again"

And that was just in the last few posts I read. I just hope you do not resort to words like "gobbledygook!"

I can't spell gobblelygoop

so you're safe there.

The people who bought homes

The people who bought homes because they wanted their child to attend a certain school (if they did so in the last 5-10 years) obviously weren't paying much attention to WCPSS' assignments.

The fact that you didn't like the options doesn't mean that the options didn't exist.  When we were reassigned a year and a half ago (to a YR school from TR, after my oldest child's K year), we decided we'd try YR.  The opt-out wouln't have been the school she attended for K if we had decided we wanted to stay TR, but I can't sit here and say that WCPSS didn't give me any options...because the fact is that they did.

How much capacity is available at the school(s) you think **should** be your traditional option?  Do you think that factors into the process of deciding which schools are offered as opt-outs? 

If the closest TR school to your YR school was your opt-out, would it make you feel better knowing that your application to opt-out was denied because you lost a lottery, instead of you deciding that the TR calendar wasn't important enough to go to the option you were given?  The easier/closer you make the opt-out, the more likely you are to bump up against capacity problems.

It isn't fair the people who were (or are) in charge of the assignment process to focus on one singular aspect and pretend you were wronged, when they have to contemplate and prioritize several different factors when they are making their decisions.  The decisions should get simpler since one major factor (diversity) has been eliminated, but that still doesn't mean that everyone is going to get exactly what they want.

...

Get a clue, dan. There were families denied a tradt'l calendar. Just because it wasn't you doesn't mean it didn't happen.

...and there will be people

...and there will be people denied their choices in any other assignment plan we use to put 143,000 students into schools.  Your point?

At the time of the conversions, there was a diversity component to Policy 6200.  That could have caused denials.

Also, schools have limits on how many kids can attend.  That could have caused denials.

Neither of those situations would have consituted the "M" in MYR.

Could have? You seem to be

Could have? You seem to be guessing.

At the time of the conversions (after Judge Manning's ruling), WCPSS was required to provide a tradt'l seat to those who did not consent to MYR. (Of course they were just temporary assignments.) The denials didn't occur until after the Supreme Court ruled and WCPSS no longer had to provide choice to everyone. You claimed there was no "M" in MYR. I beg to differ.

 

I beg to differ as well

As I have suggested, tell the 20,000 johnny-come-latelys that they get the leftovers. Put them on tracks 2 and 3 until each school is full. See how well that goes over and I suggest we get Dan to tell them! Since it doesn't affect him, he should be able to break the news to the clueless who have no idea what they are going to find upon arrival w/o losing a moments sleep.

As for schools with limits, how come several of them are not capped at this time, if there are limits? Any school over 100% capacity should be capped. Any school not at capacity should be filled.

Are we going to do that school board or are we going to continue to ignore those issues while you spit & spat and wait it out another year to see how many voters the same 200 obstructionists that have helped cause this disaster can drum up?

Manning said that WCPSS had

Manning said that WCPSS had to provide traditional opt-outs, then the SC said that WCPSS didn't have to provide opt-outs, right?  Isn't that how it works?

Even after the SC ruling, I'm pretty sure that WCPSS still tried to provide opt-outs based on space and Policy 6200 as it was written at the time.

Denial of choice based on capacity constraints does not equal "M".

If we were still headed toward an assignment plan with no bases, would you have considered it a "choice" plan even if someone was assigned to a school that was 4th or 5th on their list?

If there are 75 seats for opt-outs, and you're the 76th student, you don't put an "M" in front of your assignment. 

...

No, Manning said WCPSS had to get parental consent for MYR assignment. The Supreme Court said WCPSS didn't.

I support choice. I never said it had to be your first one. As long as stability is included in that choice, I don't see the problem.

 The ability to stay at the

 The ability to stay at the school probably wouldn't be anywhere near the top of the list for someone who was sent to their 4th or 5th choice.

Saying that you have to get parental consent is basically saying you have to offer an opt-out.  Saying differently is just semantics.  If you're required to get parental consent, you have to have a mechanism for dealing with "no" from parents.  That mechanism was/is opt-outs.

The biggest problem with the entire assignment debate is that every group wants its own particular set of guarantees, but those guarantees don't all work together.

That is why I think we should just draw some assignment areas around the schools, send the kids to them, and move on.

If you are sent to a school close to where you live, you don't have a very good argument against your assignment whether you like it or not.  The same is not true if you're offered choice but then sent to a school that you only wrote down because they demanded 5 options.

....

"That is why I think we should just draw some assignment areas around the schools, send the kids to them, and move on."

Sounds good to me -- as long as you provide viable calendar options.

 

 

There are really only two

There are really only two ways to do the calendar options.

1) Make it close to the kid's house, and then have a lottery to determine who gets in and who doesn't if space is an issue.

2) Find a school with space, and make it the option so you can provide the opt-out to as many families as possible.

Which one you consider the best would depend on how confident you are that you would win the lottery in option #1.

Of course, those two options are for the strict "lifestyle" calendar options.  I think sibling continuity should be the first priority in calendar choices, and should be taken care of prior to any other applications.

...

Or we could move back to the model that worked -- voluntary YR.

One thing that really frustrated me, however, with the VYR model was -- you could apply for YR, find out which track you were on and then deny the seat based on the track assignment. If I were king of the world, you would either accept or deny the YR seat before you got your track assignment. IMO, it's a good way of filling up a school efficiently.

 

How many volunteers would

How many volunteers would you need to make sure that you had enough seats for everyone?

I think that's the problem.

There's a lot of talk about converting this school or that school back to traditional, but if we converted 15 or 20 I don't think we'd have enough seats.

When the staff talks about empty seats currently available as we move forward, they are talking about those seats in YR schools.  If they went away, it seems that building needs would skyrocket.

...

15 or 20? Who has said that? I haven't heard much chatter about converting schools.

Voluntary YR was part of the magnet system. They limited acceptance based on F&R, etc. (but that's another issue). I suggest they only limit VYR acceptance based on capacity. Filling the school wasn't a problem then -- why should it be now? Now, granted, YR schools are not placed properly around the county right now so some adjustments might be needed to provide logical feeders. Come to think of it, wasn't that part of the SAC charge?

 

You said we should go back

You said we should go back to VYR.  I assume that would mean that every school would be traditional except for the ones that were used for the volunteers who wanted YR.

If we were going to offer VYR instead of the current system, we'd have to have TR seats for everyone who didn't volunteer.

Depending on the number of volunteers, you could have a capacity crisis really quickly.

...

I didn't mean to imply that we could easily go back to the VYR model. It worked then but too much has changed.

You can't really abandon a

You can't really abandon a policy that was never started....
 
But you can make the choices so painful that you effectively implement the policy. You can go to YR or here's a traditional option 20 miles away. That's like telling the folks in SE Raleigh that public school is not their only option. For a mere $6000 a year, they can enroll in their choice of private schools.

That's not really true,

That's not really true, unless you also tell the folks in SE Raleigh that you're going to write them a $6000 check to cover their tuition.

When WCPSS offered a traditional option, they also offered a bus.

Plus, I think the 20-mile opt out was the exception, not the rule. 

“I didn’t expect

“I didn’t expect the kind of problems we had with the assignment plan," Margiotta said. "I expected controversy but not the amount of controversy we had. The problem is we dragged out the policy.”

1) Poor politicians do not know the fight they are taking on, what people actually think, what can be trades, etc.

2) Poor politicians do not know how to navigate controversy and compromise to get what most of what they want.

Ron would be a better dictator than BOE member.

I would prefer to judge Ron on the year to year improvement in academic achievement and the number of troubled schools that were eliminated under his leadership.  I think ultimately, Ron's legacy will be how many "policies" he changed not how many kids got a better education.

I would prefer to judge Ron

I would prefer to judge Ron on the year to year improvement in academic achievement and the number of troubled schools that were eliminated under his leadership. 
 
Fair Emough. But by those standards, we've been failing in Wake County for a long time.

* New middle school math

* New middle school math placement guidelines.
* Changing the zero-tolerance discipline policies.
* Ending Wacky Wednesdays while still having teachers find the time for professional learning teams;
* Essentially ending mandatory year-round schools;
* Abandoning Forest Ridge High for the new Rolesville High;
* New partnership to allow Knightdale High students to take AP courses at Green Hope High.
 
I'd add to this list:
* Meeting a $22M budget challenge, without impacting classroom teachers.
* Ending use of the Effectiveness Index.
 
I would like to have seen a new assignment model on track for implementation, but what we'll get is a series of node changes that should, in spirit, get us to neighborhood schools.
 
When I look at what this board has been able to accomplish in less than a year and compare it to previous boards, I think they have done very well under some difficult circumstances.

Two sides to every story

New middle school math guidelines-sounds good but no proof they work better than the old ones.

Change zero-tolerance discipline policies - sounds good but what is the added cost? Where will it come from?

Enfing Wacky Wendnesdays - sent message that parent convenience was more important than education. And I would like to see someone less biased than someone from WCSA assess how well the replacement is working,

Ending MYRS -at what cost and where does the money come from?

Abandoning Forest Ridge for Rolesville High - establishing political decisions over data driven decisions. Building a $72 Million dollar school without consideration of lower cost alternatives. Building a school where there are hardly any students and where extra-long bus rides will be needed to fill it. Was ending "forced busing" just a campaign slogan?

Allowing Knightdale students to take AP courses at Green Hope. At what cost and where does the money come from? And how does that solve the abyssmally low morale of teachers at Knightdale - which will impact education there.

$22 million budget challenge w/o impacting teachers - but with the aid of $86 million in Federal stimulus and sustainability grant.

Is the reason we never get cost estimates from WCSB or the new BOE that they know it will turn public off?

Come on, Stan. Quit letting

Come on, Stan. Quit letting your partisanship color everything.

The middle school math placement guidelines? You should be all over that one if you're really concerned about making sure our minority and low income students are being given equal opportunities. You don't think it's a good thing to place students in the courses that they are qualified for? We're not talking about pushing kids into something they aren't ready for. We're talking about

As a CC you should be able to get info on how the Knightdale/Green Hope AP courses are being paid for. I've heard that a grant is covering the cost, but I don't know for sure. While I agree with you that this doesn't address teacher morale at Knightdale HS, I cannot believe that you would diminish the positives of this arrangement. Students at Knightdale have been getting the shaft for years (and will continue to). Giving them the opportunity to take additional AP courses is fantastic.

The Knightdale/GHHS

The Knightdale/GHHS interaction should be applauded by the entire county.  Knightdale HS has been overlooked and underserved by Wake because they are on the outskirts of the county.  Providing access to advanced courses for the kids there that want to take them lets them know that people in the county believe in them and that they are not forgotten.  The students morale will improve and thus the teachers jobs will become a littler easier because the students will gain a positive mental attitude knowing that they can get ahead too.  My guess is this will turn out to be a very inexpensive way to share knowledge and I hope the project succeeds. 

I think the interesting

I think the interesting story here is who came up with the idea ... which I have always wondered about  ... I don't think the BOE did, or the area superintendents, or the distance learning consultants .... I was guessing the faculty and students at GH came up with it ... I hope I am right ... I am guessing an AP person and the media person where having lunch and subject of AP disparity came up and the idea as born ... I am guessing the principal who does not run the top HS being cowardly said do it ... I am guessing the area superintendent fought it because the idea did not come from HQ .... eventually the momentum of the idea over ran the bureaucracy ....GH is one of the top schools in the nation and it is only logical that they would come up with an out of the box solution once someone realized they had the most AP classes and KD had the least .... 

Stan, you know the math placement works

You've seen the data from WFRMS and WMMS, when you place children based on their academic ability the gap closes.

Let's remind folks of the history of math placement:

10 years ago WCPSS formed a committee to discuss equity in math placement. Lack of equity was documented, the report was written and put on a shelf. Nothing changed.

5 years ago the math collaborative was formed to discuss equity in math placement. Lack of equity was documented, the report was written and put on a shelf.

2009 - SAS documents the inequity and Del, David, Kevin and others try and hide it.

2010. John Tedesco forms the ED Task Force, the lack of equity is documented and math placement is on the way to becoming a board policy.

Give the man some credit for valuing all children and carrying through on his campaign promises. We (the democrats) have failed miserably. We need to do better - in actions, not just in empty words about diversity.

Disappointing

You've seen the data from WFRMS and WMMS, when you place children based on their academic ability the gap closes.

I've seen a contrary analysis, but assuming you are correct - the gap you are talking about is the admissions gap to Algebra I. The proof will be when the pass rate of those students previously denied entry is at or near others in the cohort.

Worse yet, you are implying motivations to Del, David and Kevin for which you haven't the slightest proof. I thought you were a scientist - but no evidence of that here. Rather than simply push for the best technology to assess student performance, you attach yourself to a group that routinely denies the existence of enormous amounts of scientific evidence regarding the value of diversity. A group that supports the creation of schools with high concentrations of poverty, again with ample evidence of their hugely negative impact. Yet you are silent about the unjustice of that and the motivation of those who support it..

I've seen a contrary

I've seen a contrary analysis, but assuming you are correct - the gap you are talking about is the admissions gap to Algebra I. The proof will be when the pass rate of those students previously denied entry is at or near others in the cohort.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stan, have you heard any of the reports from schools who were the 'test' schools for this?  A few years ago, one principal moved kids up to Alg in October and the passing rate for those kids was excellent.  (I don't remember the exact rate, but it was quite good).  Interestingly, disciplinary issues with these kids went down significantly.  When WF-R MS did this last year (or the year before), they saw great success.  They did use an 80% cutoff instead of the 70%, and that topic has been up for discussion, but this was still a success.  If I remember correctly, the principal said they found that the highest scoring kid on the 5th grade EOGs had been placed in the low math track.  After being moved up, he was still the highest scoring kid.
 
If the kids being denied were all in the 70-80% range while those who had been placed in the high math track were in the 80-100% range, I could absolutely understand your skepticism.  But that is not how the placements were made. 
 
Turn your accusations of snordone on yourself, Stan.  You're so convinced that this is part of some evil plot that you refuse to see the truth.

Just curious - have you read

Just curious - have you read the SAS report?  The one that showed minority kids were under-represented by over 20% in 8th grade algebra?   That the difference was enough that SAS said it must be a result of some overt process and should be investigated?   Never mind the pass rate - they never even got the chance.

Also - that almost 70% of AA Level 4 males were in remedial classes?  That students made negative 'progress' in remedial classes?

I hope you just didn't read the report - i still can't believe that the NAACP isn't all over this, and that you choose to pick apart Ms. Nordone's post rather than acknowledge this huge injustice.

The County will have to

The County will have to maintain the zero tolerance policy since Wake County is unwilling to learn other ways to approach the students. 
 

Hi Stan, A few points to

Hi Stan,

A few points to consider...

New middle school math guidelines-sounds good but no proof they work better than the old ones.
 
The new guidelines directly addressed the discriminatory practice of holding back poor and minority students from higher-level math.  I'd call that "working."  I don't see how you can question whether a more equitable approach "works better" than one that discriminates.
 
Enfing Wacky Wendnesdays - sent message that parent convenience was more important than education. And I would like to see someone less biased than someone from WCSA assess how well the replacement is working.
 
No, the decision to end Wacky Wednesdays sent a message that the school board was actually listening to parents.  Many WCPSS schools had PLT's in place before Jeniffer Lanane succeeded in ramming through her cookie-cutter approach.  Those same PLT's now  function just as well, but without Big Brother dictating the whens and hows.  BTW, consistent with your cost theme, how much did it cost WCPSS to buy new school zone signs all over the County because of WW's resultant schedule changes?
 
Ending MYRS -at what cost and where does the money come from?
 
For now, the board is saving money based on the schools they converted back to traditional, because they are less expensive to operate.  Long term, we'll see.
 
Allowing Knightdale students to take AP courses at Green Hope. At what cost and where does the money come from?
 
I'm sure it costs less than offering AP Mandarin Chinese III at Enloe. 

We need data driven decisions

 For now, the board is saving money based on the schools they converted back to traditional, because they are less expensive to operate.  Long term, we'll see.

I  believe YRS are about $1M per year lower in cost to operate than a standard calendar school– if operated near capacity. I have a WCPSS staff analysis to that effect.  Have you accounted  for local admininastrative overhead?

 You imply,  without directly saying so, that the added capacity of YRS, will reduce construction costs for new schools – the reason they were adopted in the first place. As I have noted elsewhere, a good part of that savings can be applied to teachers and learning.

You also ignore that most the poll that showed most parents valued stability  far ahead of choice in calendar.

Nor do you acknowledge RonM’s statement that he would convert more YRS to a standard calendar but could not afford it.

I can understand that YRS pose a serious impact to some families. I think those families need to be accomodated. Under other circumstances, I have not supported YRS. But I think we need to operate with data driven, rather than political driven, decisions.

It's one thing to express a

It's one thing to express a need for data driven decisions and another to actually make decisions based on data.  It seems all I heard were the words "data driven" when I worked for the system.  Even with data that supported my dedication and effectiveness, I was forced to resign based on a personal grudge.  There were staff in the department in which I worked that didn't even turn in their data for the year.  They still work for the County.

Lesson to be learned.  People can say anything.  What's more significant is to watch what they do.

But I think we need to

But I think we need to operate with data driven, rather than political driven, decisions.
 
Why do diversity assignment supporters consider any decision they don't agree with to be "politically-" or "ideologically-" driven?  I call it parent-driven.
 
I  believe YRS are about $1M per year lower in cost to operate than a standard calendar school– if operated near capacity. I have a WCPSS staff analysis to that effect.  Have you accounted  for local admininastrative overhead?
 
That's a big "if," and one which does not reflect today's reality.  And when those schools are under-enrolled with a YR calendar, they cost more per student.
 
What a shame, that we used to have a very successful VYR program that filled schools to capacity, but was killed because those schools were not "diverse enough."  Minority/ED students traditionally opt out of YR schools.  If we go back to a VYR program, we will end up with those schools being predominantly white/NED.  Given our financial circumstances, are you ok with that?

YRS

We have to look forward not backward as you are doing. There should be other ways of filling YRS.

Here are 2 ways as we look forward

1: Tell the 20,000 who think this "best of" county is going to change their world that when they arrive they get a choice of track 2 or track 3. Problem solved.

or

2: Shuffle the cards now and create a new assignment plan NOW to start next year that puts all who want track 2 or 3 on those tracks. When not enough "volunteer" then throw everyone in a hat and pull names until schools that are now below 90% are full. Problem solved.

Then call Forbes, Newsweek and the rest and opt out of continuing to lie to America telling them their utopia awaits. What bull.

Which of these ideas would you support Stan?

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About the blogger

T. Keung Hui covers Wake schools.
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