WakeEd

The WakeEd blog is devoted to discussing and answering questions about the major issues facing the Wake County school system. How will the new student assignment plan balance diversity, stability, proximity and stability? How will Jim Merrill replace Tony Tata as the new superintendent of the state's largest district? How will voters react to a $810 million school construction bond referendum on Oct. 8 ballot? How will this fall's school board elections impact the future of the district?

WakeEd is maintained by The News & Observer's Wake schools reporter, T. Keung Hui. While Keung posts information and analysis on the issues, keep us posted on your suggestions, questions, tips and what you're doing to cope with the changes in Wake's schools.

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Debating whether to build new schools in Southeast Raleigh

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The question of whether to build new schools in Southeast Raleigh is becoming a political issue that could have a major impact on Wake County's magnet school program.

As noted in today's article, school board member John Tedesco wants additional schools in Southeast Raleigh to accommodate the return of neighborhood kids and to leave open seats at area magnet schools. A News & Observer analysis shows 5,244 Southeast Raleigh kids now live at addresses bused for diversity.

But school board member Keith Sutton and some of the other leadership of Southeast Raleigh aren't so thrilled with getting new schools. They're worried that the new schools won't provide a good quality education.

“As I see it now, the plan just throws a carrot or a bone to District 4,” said Sutton, who represents Southeast Raleigh based District 4 on the board. “Just because it's new doesn't get it for me and it doesn't get it for people in Southeast Raleigh.”

Sutton made a similar argument on Aug. 22 while speaking at a back-to-school meeting at Compassion Tabernacle of Faith Missionary Baptist Church, across the street from Southeast Raleigh High.

“It doesn't help us to have a shiny new school if at the end of the day it won't be a good school, if you're not providing a good quality education with good teachers,” Sutton told church members. “It shouldn't be an attempt to simply house students in District 4 rather than having them in other communities, which is what some of my colleagues want to do.”

Tedesco says a new community zone system will have to include much more capacity for Southeast Raleigh. He says he believes many Southeast Raleigh students will want to return under the new community schools model.

“I think that they deserve the same opportunity that other parts of the county have," Tedesco said. "The current system force-buses kids to other parts of the county and brings in kids to their neighborhoods. That doesn't seem fair to me.”

If there isn't enough capacity then you're going to put a major limitation on the number of kids who can attend the downtown and Southeast Raleigh magnet schools.

It's possible that some of the current magnet seats will be reduced to increase base attendance. It's something that school board chairman Ron Margiotta said he could accept at last week's Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce meeting.

“Why should students be bused out of schools across the street from them so that some rich kid can come from Cary, or from my district?” said Margiotta, whose district includes Apex and Holly Springs.

Margiotta added that they'd still need to maintain enough magnet seats at the schools to keep the programs viable. He said he doesn't want the magnet program eliminated.

“Magnet schools will be here forever as far as I’m concerned,” Margiotta said. “They serve an excellent purpose.”

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Commentary Merit Pay or Team

Commentary

Merit Pay or Team Accountability?

The Principal?

I struggle with the use of the principal as the "expert" who gives recommendations to the classroom teachers.    The principal has elected to pursue a management path deliberately taking themselves out of the classroom.   While they do have a teaching background, it seems like the best recommendations would come from other teaching peers.  I have seen this in action and the principal ended up focused on the administrative details (e.g.whether students were late and the teacher made them sign a tardy sheet) rather than whether the students seemed to be grasping the material being taught or, if not, what were the factors involved.   If the team is the level of the reward, then perhaps a mechanism needs to be developed to have the team be able to see each other's teaching styles by observation.   Alternatively, if a group of very effective teachers could be identified, they could form a team and give feedback to teachers.  All information could be furnished to the principal.   

ot

 D.C. schools' performance should not be measured by focusing on achievement gap 

By Jay Mathews

Monday, August 30, 2010 

The D.C. mayoral race is deeply split on most issues, but everyone agrees on one thing: We must reduce the achievement gap between minority and white students. It is too bad, then, that the gap is such a mindless measure of school progress.

D.C. Council Chairman Vincent Gray says: "The achievement gap . . . really has not been reduced over the past three years irrespective of test scores. It really is an important thing." Mayor Adrian Fenty's campaign Web site endorses the gap's significance but insists the mayor has "narrowed the achievement gap by as much as 20 percent . . . from 2007 to 2009." The Post's columnist Colbert I. King says the gaps in test scores between children of the city's affluent and poor, between white and black, "go to the heart of school reform efforts."

The numbers tell another story. Here is what my colleague Bill Turque reported in his Aug. 19 story on education issues in the mayoral race: "Average math scores of white D.C. fourth-graders [on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)] grew from 262 in 2007 to 270 last year (on a scale of 500). Scores rose three points for D.C. African American students, from 209 to 212. So the gap widened from 53 points to 58."

He compared students in Ward 7, relatively low income, with the more affluent students of Ward 3 on the DC-CAS tests. "In Ward 7, reading proficiency rates for secondary students rose from 17 percent in 2007 to 28 percent in 2010 -- 11 points," he wrote. "But Ward 3's rate rose almost 13 points in that time, and the disparity between the two wards remains about 50 points."

So, nearly everyone seems to agree, math scores of black D.C. fourth-graders went up three points, reading scores of mostly black and low-income Ward 7 secondary school students went up 11 points, and somehow that's bad news. Why? Because the scores of white students and Ward 3 students went up more. If their scores had not changed, or gone down just a bit, we would all be celebrating a narrowing of the achievement gap, our favorite measure of city schools.

Here are some other dubious ways to make the gap smaller and be happy: Have no improvement in black scores but a drop in white scores, or have black scores decline but white scores go down even more. We seem to have taken our concern about the income gap in America and adopted the same vocabulary when we talk about schools, even though making more money and learning to read are very different activities. Achieving proficiency in math, and particularly in reading, is key to the futures of both black and white children, both rich ones and poor ones. Focusing on the gap encourages us to ignore or downplay the success of children in one group in favor of comparing their gains with others. Brookings Institution scholar Tom Loveless says this has, among other things, led us to overlook meager improvement in some groups.

Worse, it has denied recognition to hardworking minority and low-income students, and their teachers, when they score gains but don't close the gap. We know some D.C. minority children have been improving, but a large chart accompanying Turque's recent story on the gap made it impossible to determine how much. The numbers were about differences, not gains.

Why not work at raising achievement for every child, in every demographic category, instead of obsessing about the gap? I don't blame politicians or journalists for enabling this deceptive mind-set. Everyone does it. It is woven into the way we think about schools, from the president on down. But that doesn't mean it makes any sense, or that we shouldn't try to rethink school progress in a more useful way.

For more Jay, go to washingtonpost.com/class-struggle.  

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/29/AR2010082902750.html 

As Margiotta notes

Why should students be bused out of schools across the street from them so that some rich kid can come from Cary, or from my district?” said Margiotta, whose district includes Apex and Holly Springs.   - Excellent point and likewise why should a rich kid be bused in when there is a perfectly good neighborhood school they can attend. 

Margiotta added that they'd still need to maintain enough magnet seats at the schools to keep the programs viable. He said he doesn't want the magnet program eliminated. - As diversity is to be achieved by the natural progression, keeping a magnet program is social manipulation.

“Magnet schools will be here forever as far as I’m concerned,” Margiotta said. “They serve an excellent purpose.”  - Maybe Ron can share what that purpose is.

 

 

“Magnet schools will

“Magnet schools will be here forever as far as I’m concerned,” Margiotta said. “They serve an excellent purpose.”  - Maybe Ron can share what that purpose is.

Diversity through choice, which is what most proponents of diverse schools believe.

If

If one believes diversity is a value worth pursuing then the opportunities need to be a two way street. A magnet program is a one way street. 

Not following.

Not following.

A magnet

A magnet allows affluent kids from the burbs to attend a high poverty school in exchange for some level of enticement - whether it be a wider offering of AP classes or special electives. As many anti-magnet people have pointed out - these special offerings create a school within a school and do not help the base student's achievement.

What is available for the base students who want to escape their otherwise poverty school ?

 

 

  

wrong

The problem with your premise is that it is entirely incorrect.  The magnet schools are NOT a school within a school.  The only programs close to anything like that are the magnet schools with a separate AG program, and even those are being redesigned. Also, ALL schools offer some form of an AG program, so the separation exists at all schools. Any opportunities provided in the magnet schools are available to ALL students at that school. 

Many anti-magnet

I did not claim a school within a school - Many anti-magnet bloggers have claimed a school within the school. 

First, isnt' that the basic

First, isnt' that the basic premise of diversity based assignments?

<sarcasm>
Bus middle class students from the suburbs into the magnet schools and everybody wins. That's the only thing that ED students need to succeed, right? A healthy school, that is majority middle class, and the ED students rise with the rest.
</sarcasm>

If students come to a magnet school for a program consisting of difficult and challenging course work - classes that base students are not prepared to enroll in -  you cannot avoid creating a school within a school.

Take Enloe, for example. In 2003, the coach of the Enloe football team quit precisely because he was fed up with coaching a team from a school within a school. He claimed that the ED students were not being treated fairly by the administration.

??  Was that on the blog

??  Was that on the blog (Enloe's football coach quotes)?? 

And I don't think magnet parent is saying you are wrong - but that this is the situation anywhere - there are kids that take challenging coursework at Leesville and kids that don't - it doesn't make it a school within a school?  Unless you are proposing assigning based on ability?

If you are saying that base magnet students can't do challenging coursework, aren't you guilty of what TrailerParkGirl is constantly telling us is wrong?  How can you know what the kids are capable of based on where they live? 

Show me diversity at their

Show me diversity at their graduation ceremony and I'll become a believer.

oh goodness, it appears you

oh goodness, it appears you are saying that students that live around magnets can't do challenging coursework....

it appears you are saying

it appears you are saying that students that live around magnets can't do challenging coursework

If you mean ED students, then you must have me confused with Ruby Payne, or maybe with one of Chuck Dulaney's "generalizations."  You asserted that ED students are taking advantage of higher-level high school course offerings.  All I'm asking is where's the beef?  How come the demographics of graduates from schools like Enloe don't mirror the demographics of their enrollments?

I'm sure there are exceptions, but I believe that most students who have the ambition to enroll in AP courses generally have the commitment to graduate from high school.  So either those Enloe kids are taking AP Calculus or other advanced courses and then deciding "never mind" about graduation, or they aren't taking the courses to begin with.  Which is it?

I did not claim to know the

I did not claim to know the low-income participation rates in AP classes - you must have misunderstood something.

I said kids living around Enloe are just as capable of challenging coursework as anyone else and you said where's the proof, I took this to mean you are saying they are not capable.  Now it seems you meant to say that they are not currently taking challenging coursework, assumed based on graduation rates.  Is that correct? 

You are arguing that Enloe

You are arguing that Enloe and the like are not a "2 schools within a school."  I say they are.  The disparity in graduation rates between subgroups strongly suggests that they are not spending time in the same classes -- thus, they are effectively in different schools (except for lunch break).

The disparity in graduation

The disparity in graduation rates between subgroups strongly suggests that they are not spending time in the same classes

You are assuming all schools start with the same level of student ....that all F&R are equal ... could the base F&R students at Enloe be a harder challenge than ones at Apex?  I would not jump to the only difference is in the classroom.  If you are just looking at graduation rates only could the higher standards (same class but higher expectations) at Enloe discourages F&R students who would be passed along elsewhere?  I am guessing some schools in NC pass kids along and just need to get them past a few EOCs which  enough "coaching" and teaching to the test can be accomplished.

I'm not assuming all F&R are

I'm not assuming all F&R are "equal," you are also confusing me with Chuck.  At Enloe, we know the ED graduation rate is significantly lower than non-ED.  Many have argued that magnets are not two schools within a school, I believe the Enloe results show that there really is separation between ED and non-ED students.  But it's ok if those ED kids drop out, as long as they are in a "diverse" school, right?

Graduation rates are lower

Graduation rates are lower for ED kids everywheree - not just Enloe or Garner or other magnets - there are schools within schools everywhere if you are just meaning separate subgroups tend to take different classes and graduate at different rates.  

Right, we were busing kids

Right, we were busing kids so that they could sit in different classrooms within the same school.  In fact, the Ruby Payne model helped make sure that ED and NED students ended up in different classrooms, at least for math.  At some point in the day the kids have a nice diverse lunch break, then go back to their separate classrooms.  And I think this gets worse in high school, where there are three different tracks (academic/honors/AP).

how is this "busing"

how is this "busing" specific?  Don't ED kids take less advanced classes at all schools, whether it's a magnet school than it it's not?  Do you have evidence that ED kids take more advanced classes when they are in neighborhood schools - and does this hold true if those schools are high poverty?  (Guilford has data on this - I don't have time to look it up but I don't think it supports the idea that ED kids will be better served in high poverty neighborhood non-magnet schools)

It's busing in the sense

It's busing in the sense that we created a magnet like Enloe, so that middle class suburban kids could choose to be bused to Enloe for the enhanced curriculum. And the purpose of enticing middle class students to Enloe was because it was thought that it would have a very positive effect on the ED base. But the ED graduation rate at Enloe is amongst the lowest in all of Wake, which tends to validate the school within a school theory. So why go through all that effort to create a magnet program, and bus in the middle class kids, if it's of no benefit to the ED base? It seems it would be much cheaper for the middle class kids to take their AP classes at their local suburban school.

What do you mean by

What do you mean by diversity?  a believer in what? 

??  Was that on the blog

??  Was that on the blog (Enloe's football coach quotes)?? 

No it was reported in the N&O, published February 12, 2003. Look it up.

And I don't think magnet parent is saying you are wrong - but that this is the situation anywhere - there are kids that take challenging coursework at Leesville and kids that don't - it doesn't make it a school within a school?

I was referring mainly to AG programs where you see very little, if any, overlap among students. At least in some of the other schools you see students take an English Class or a History Class together. But in a place like Enloe, where students load up on AP classes, you see very little overlap between the base students and the application students.

If you are saying that base magnet students can't do challenging coursework, aren't you guilty of what TrailerParkGirl is constantly telling us is wrong?  How can you know what the kids are capable of based on where they live? 

Not saying that at all. If you look at my original post, you will see that I said they are unable to take classes that they are not prepared for. If you want to take Algebra in 8th grade, you pretty much have to be identified in the 6th grade - and we saw the problem with that. And you can't just jump into an AP Physics class or an AP Chemistry class, without years of preparation.

I actually have met Coach

I actually have met Coach Thompson and I am not sure I totally understood why he resigned.  He said it was lack of support, but then there is another quote from the article from a student on the team saying Coach Thompson told a class that "the school was racist."  I'm not sure why the administration (which was not all white by the way) would be ok with a teacher telling their class that the school was racist.  Maybe the kid got the quote wrong, but I really don't think you can take one disgruntled football coach at the low point of his coaching career 5 disappointing season in and use a quote to make a statement to what Enloe is like now, 7 years later. 

Another data point

My doctor was one of the Enloe football physicians. He sends his kids to Ravenscroft because he was so 'disgusted' with what he saw at Enloe. This refers to the 'school within a school'.

Enloe has football

Enloe has football physicians?

so if he did not like the school within a school at enloe - why would you go ravenscroft???

Football Physicians

I just love the way things get twisted around. From what I can tell all football teams have physicians. Basically they are Orthopedic surgeons who donate their time to the team. So when the kid is hauled off the field for torn ACL, knee strain, or whatever - here is my card come and see me an I will fix you up. Triangle and Raleigh Orthopedics have late office hours on Friday night until 9-10pm and Saturday morning to cater to the wounded football players. 

To go from Enloe to Ravenscroft is an extreme step. My guess is that he was disgusted by the demographics of the school, probably felt intimated when as part of freshman orientation had to take lock down 101.

yeah I didn't understand why

yeah I didn't understand why a move from Enloe to Ravenscroft would make sense fleeing a "school within a school" - unless it was that outer school one was fleeing...

He didn't like what he saw

He didn't like what he saw at Enloe at all, and was also 'unimpressed' with the rest of the BOE actions at the time (this was several years ago), so he opted out of WCPSS.  Lucky for him, he could afford Ravenscroft.  That's really beside the point - the point is he saw firsthand what was going on at this magnet school and opted out.

I totally understand - the

I totally understand - the question is what was "going on" at the school to make someone leave WCPSS altogether for Ravenscroft? 

Hypocrisy

Hypocrisy

Certainly not a casual

Certainly not a casual decision, Ravenscroft costs $22K/year.
 

"I was referring mainly to

"I was referring mainly to AG programs where you see very little, if any, overlap among students."

You need to separate AG from Magnet.  AG students at all schools can have differentiated education.  Regarding Enloe, since it is part of their magnet program, they likely have a higher concentration of AG students in their school.  This allows them to approach their differentiated services differently (ie. fill more advanced classes to capacity). But still, that does not refuse or prevent AG students from the base population to participate in the same program. AG is AG.  A student has to qualify as AG to participate.  It has nothing to do with whether they are base or application.  Keep in mind that Enloe, Ligon and Carnage also offer a Gifted and Talented Magnet program.  There are opportunities to participate in the magnet program, with no restrictions.

"I said they are unable to take classes that they are not prepared for." 

Again, this is NOT a characteristic of a Magnet program. That happens in all schools.  As you are aware, there is plenty of discussion about this on another thread.

"As noted in today's

"As noted in today's article, school board member John Tedesco wants additional schools in Southeast Raleigh to accommodate the return of neighborhood kids and to leave open seats at area magnet schools. A News & Observer analysis shows 5,244 Southeast Raleigh kids now live at addresses bused for diversity."

 

It looks like John's plan to get the SE kids out of Garner depends on new schools being built in SE.  Given that we have enough total capacity in the system with kids going to school where they are now (5244/139,000 =4% bussed for diversity), I can not see building new schools to move a few kids a few miles from one school district to another for John's benefit.  

The percentage bused for

The percentage bused for diversity will be higher. We analyzed only the Southeast Raleigh area. We didn't look at places like downtown Cary or the pockets in northeast Raleigh where predominantly low-income kids are assigned at least in some part for diversity reasons. We're also not getting into the non-F&R nodes that are sent to a different school in part to lower the povety percentage.
 

If the % is less than 4%

If the % is less than 4% using SE (I rounded up), I am guessing the % won't grow considerably when you look elsewhere for misc nodes ... probably still be around the 5% often cited.  I am always amazed that people think diversity issue is huge number.  When you look at Barwell which has a huge F&R% (>60%) and most of the kids live like 2 miles away (true neighborhood school) there are a lot of schools with huge poor populations that are not being bussed anywhere else.

"We're also not getting into

"We're also not getting into the non-F&R nodes that are sent to a different school in part to lower the povety percentage."
 
Keung, thanks for pointing this out.  Too often we're not mentioned what's going on with non-F&R kids which make up >68.795% (ok with you Dan?) of the systems population.  For every 1 F&R kid that was bused for diversity, there has to be 1 non-F&R kid who was either bused or is sitting in a class room with a higher student:teacher ratio.
 
Keung, is there any way we could finally get the real % of kids bused for diversity?  User and others have often claimed it was around 1% but based on your comment, I'm thinking the real # could be closer to 20-30% or more.   

 

I should add that the 3rd

I should add that the 3rd option is that some of those non-F&R kids who were "moved" due to diversity did so "voluntarily" since they probably lived in a "golden" node with priority of selection to a magnet and chose this route vs staying in their over-crowed and watered down local school.

It was actually a one-word

It was actually a one-word mistake on your part.  You used "over" when you should have used "almost".  Almost 70% is different than over 70%.  A 2% difference over the entire district is 2800 kids.

There's no need to be anal about it.

Since Wake claims it doesn't

Since Wake claims it doesn't know now many kids are bused for diversity or has a list of all those nodes, it gets really subjective once you look outside Southeast Raleigh. I means there's no real question if you see a Southeast Raleigh node going to Green Hope High or Leesville Road Elementary that it's done for diversity.  Once you look outside that area, especially at non F&R nodes, you can have pretty heated arguments over whether this aassignment is for diveristy.

It is odd to have a program

It is odd to have a program that you do not keep records of the number (or percentage) of students you move due to the program. I find the 1 to 4 percent number thrown around on this blog to be to low. Someone at WCPSS knows or at best should know.

I think there are/were

I think there are/were people who knew what the real number was, but you'd have better luck getting Colonel Sanders to give up his secret recipe for fried chicken (and he's dead).

More Bused

Given a trade-off it's possible that families won't mind their child being bused locally (where they can still have nearby support system and public transportation) rather than an hour each way. http://venitapeyton.com 

Southeast Raleigh asset

I guess Mr. Sutton wasn't at the Barwell Road groundbreaking in 2005, attended by many dignitaries including the late Senator Vernon Malone (who, by the way, fought for new schools to be built in SE Raleigh.)

http://www.barwellroadmusic.com/aboutbarwell.htm

 

Wake County Board of Education members Amy White and Rosa Gill, Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker, Wake County Commissioners Chairman Joe Bryan, and Raleigh City Councilman James West raved about the joint project and what it will mean for the area. State Sen. Vernon Malone, state Rep. Bernard Allen, school board member Bill Fletcher, county commissioner Betty Lou Ward, City Manager Russell Allen, and other community leaders were also on hand to show their support.

“We’re celebrating something that will be an asset to the community,” said White. “I think of it not as a school, but as an institute for leaders. I offer my humble thanks to everyone here today."

Councilman West, who Gill recognized for being instrumental in bringing the project to Southeast Raleigh, has his finger on the pulse of the community. “The neighborhood is buzzing. There’s a lot of community pride and a lot of ownership here. I’m delighted to be a part of this effort.”

OK, so you're offering

OK, so you're offering Barwell as an example of what we should want in SER?  If so, go to here and tell me why this should be the model:  http://tinyurl.com/397bs6m.

They didn't come close to the district or state average in any category. 

Example of hope and expectation

No. I did not say that it was an example of performance. I used it as an example of the hypocricy and duplicity of some - saying what is convenient for the political moment. I also would not use the Effectiveness Index as an example of how to place children, or, in fact, how to identify effectiveness. It is a similar deception. There is a lot of manipulation of the truth in our system now - many who would speak out of both sides of their mouths. We should allow children to have the best opportunities and the highest expectations where they can be supported easily by their family and neighbors. One does not negate the other. 

I think the national model promoted by the Obama administration and Arne Duncan, emulated in what John Tedesco is proposing on the local level, offers a lot of positive productive ideas and hope for the internal programs of our schools - especially those with large percentages of children who are struggling to achieve. The fact that they are place-based programs (their term), focused on building up children and family's broken relationships with their neighborhoods - should be seen as a GOOD thing. Proximity matters in these programs. So, let's build on that hope and optimism that was evident that groundbreaking day at Barwell and introduce the community model programs that will work to raise those scores. Eradicate deceitfulness from the system like the Effectiveness Index that uses children for political gain, and raise all children up regardless of what's in their wallet. The proximity of Barwell to SE Raleigh neighborhoods is a good beginning and was clearly seen as a hopeful indicator in 2005. Not, in fact, the predictor of doom that Mr. Sutton so sadly proclaimed any future SE Raleigh school. Why don't more people object to this kind of insult? 

There are five years of data

There are five years of data from Barwell that let people know what to expect from a neighborhood school in SE Raleigh.  Five years ago that didn't exist.  Now it does.  Facts are not insults, even if the facts are uncomfortable.

Barwell has to be one of the worst-performing elementary schools in WCPSS.  795 of its 837 students (08-09) were from 2 miles or less away.  The kids there aren't failing because of their bus rides.

The problem with the "community" model is that you are making dangerous decisions if you partner with outside organizations for basic needs.  Those organizations are not under the control of the district, so you have to have a plan in place just in case the organizations do not keep up their end of the bargain. 

I'm pretty sure that the Effectiveness Index is a tool to measure teachers, not a placement mechanism. 

No...they are not failing

No...they are not failing because of their bus rides.  We should, however, be able to figure out why they are failing (all of this failing, by the way, was under the watch of the previous BOE as we're using 08-09 data).

Let's list some reasons they may be failing:

1.  Their parents

2.  Their community leaders, mentors etc. (or lack there of)

3.  Class size (more detail below)

 

  Kindergarten Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5
Barwell 25 22 22 23 23 25
District 21 21 21 21 21 22
State 19 19 19 19 21 21

4. Teachers (more detail below)

Fully Licenced Teachers:

 

Barwell 95%
District 99%
State 98%

Teachers with Advanced Degrees:

 

Barwell 19%
District 31%
State 27%

Years of Teaching Experience

 

  0 - 3 Years 4 - 10 Years 10+ Years
Barwell 29% 40% 32%
District 24% 34% 43%
State 23% 30% 47%

Barwell is "worse" that the District and the State in ALL three Major areas of "Teacher Quality".  That blame can lie solely at the feet of the former BOE.

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About the blogger

T. Keung Hui covers Wake schools.
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