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FBI warns bin Laden links are malware

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Spammers and hackers are baiting online users with links to purported images or video related to the death of Osama bin Laden to spread malicious software.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation issued statement warning users not to click the links.

Malicious links have been spread through email and Facebook. Security firm F-Secure says one virus discovered is the Trojan horse Banload which steals passwords.

The full statement from the FBI:

Malicious Software Features Usama bin Laden Links to Ensnare Unsuspecting Computer Users

Washington, D.C. May 03, 2011     

    * FBI National Press Office (202) 324-3691

The FBI today warns computer users to exercise caution when they receive e-mails that purport to show photos or videos of Usama bin Laden’s recent death. This content could be a virus that could damage your computer. This malicious software, or “malware,” can embed itself in computers and spread to users’ contact lists, thereby infecting the systems of associates, friends, and family members. These viruses are often programmed to steal your personally identifiable information.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) urges computer users to not open unsolicited (spam) e-mails, including clicking links contained within those messages. Even if the sender is familiar, the public should exercise due diligence. Computer owners must ensure they have up-to-date firewall and anti-virus software running on their machines to detect and deflect malicious software.

The IC3 recommends the public do the following:

    * Adjust the privacy settings on social networking sites you frequent to make it more difficult for people you know and do not know to post content to your page. Even a “friend” can unknowingly pass on multimedia that’s actually malicious software.
    * Do not agree to download software to view videos. These applications can infect your computer.
    * Read e-mails you receive carefully. Fraudulent messages often feature misspellings, poor grammar, and nonstandard English.
    * Report e-mails you receive that purport to be from the FBI. Criminals often use the FBI’s name and seal to add legitimacy to their fraudulent schemes. In fact, the FBI does not send unsolicited e-mails to the public. Should you receive unsolicited messages that feature the FBI’s name, seal, or that reference a division or unit within the FBI or an individual employee, report it to the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov.

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Useful

Very useful story. Seems that some people still click on links in their e-mail.

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About the blogger

matthewmugMatthew Fortner has been at The News & Observer since 2002. He has a passion for gadgets, cutting-edge technology and all things geek.
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