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Fired N.C. School of Science and Math employee comes back with different job, same pay

Cynthia White -- the personnel employee that state officials said was wrongly fired from the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics -- is returning to the school in a different job at the same pay.

White will work as a social/clinical research assistant for the elite public high school in Durham, making the same $49,148 a year salary she received before she was fired in mid 2010. The school has also agreed to give her back pay and benefits.

Aaron Plourde, the school's communications director, said the new job, back pay and benefits are not part of a settlement. He said school officials decided to accept the decision of the State Personnel Commission, which ruled that White was wrongly fired.

Plourde said the decision allows for White's attorney to petition the commission to order the school to pay reasonable legal costs in the case.

A new, interim head for NCSSM

A longtime leader in North Carolina public schools  will be the interim head of the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics.

Thomas J. Williams of Raleigh will become the school's interim chancellor Aug. 17. He succeeds Gerald Boarman, who is stepping down July 31 to become head of the Bullis School in Potomac, Md.

Williams will receive pro-rated pay based on an annual salary of $215,000. A UNC system spokeswoman said a permanent chancellor will likely be chosen this fall.

Laura Luger, the UNC system's general counsel, will be active chancellor for those 17 days before Williams begins work.

A Massachusetts native, William began his career in 1975 as a teacher and coach in the Wake County schools. He later moved into administration, serving as a principal at elementary, middle and high schools in Johnston and Granville counties before becoming an assistant superintendent of Johnston Public Schools in 1994.

Three years later, he became executive director of the N.C. Business Committee for Education and in 2000 became superintendent of the Granville County Schools. He served in that capacity until retiring in 2007.

The NCSSM is still searching for a replacement for Boarman, who surprised many in Durham with his decision to step down after a decade at the helm of the elite, residential high school for academically gifted students.

The school's enrollment swelled under his leadership, though questions also arose over administrators he hired and pay he received.
 

Who got the job?

On Sunday we reported about the lack of transparency regarding the 2007 hire of Brock Winslow as the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics' vice chancellor for development. Search committee notes and a comparison of resumes have raised questions whether Winslow won the job over someone with more experience because of his insider status.

Click below to read what a search committee noted after interviewing Winslow and the other finalist, Perna Carter, a Voorhees College vice president.

NCSSM's Boarman has a new job

Gerald Boarman, who announced earlier this week his plans to retire as chancellor at the N.C. School of Science and Math, has a new job lined up.

Boarman, whose resignation from NCSSM is effective July 31, takes over this summer as the head of the Bullis School, a private school in Potomac, MD.

The Maryland school is a college preparatory day school for grades 3 to 12 just outside Washington D.C. It announced Boarman's hiring in this press release.

“We look to Jerry first and foremost as an educational leader who will sustain and enhance our excellent academic program, and his entire career attests to his ability to fulfill that role,” Ken Thompson, chair of the Bullis School. board of trustees, said in the release. “We also anticipate that he will provide tremendous assistance to our ongoing capital campaign, and to the continued improvement of our science and technology facilities.”

Boarman surprised many in Durham with his decision to step down after a decade at the helm of the elite, residential high school for academically gifted students. The school's enrollment swelled under his leadership, though questions also arose over administrators he hired and pay he received.

 

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