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UNC-CH trustees okay tuition and fee hikes

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At UNC Chapel Hill, trustees have signed off on a tuition and fee increase package for the next academic year.

The plan, which will now be submitted to the UNC system's Board of Governors, raises tuition $200 for in-state students. Out-of-state undergrads would get a $1,127 rate hike, while out-of-state grad students would pay $732 more in 2010-11.   Fees would go up $96.01 for all students.

Under the plan, in-state undergraduate students would pay $5,921.42 in tuition and fees next year, and out-of-staters would pay $24,736.42.

Those numbers do not include room, board, books and other expenses.

There's a catch to all this. The 2009 General Assembly has already set rates for 2010-11 that will raise in-state tuition $200 or 8 percent, whichever is less. That decision trumps anything on the campus or UNC-system level.

So the tuition rates the UNC-CH campus trustees approved today include that $200 increase for in-state students.

But last UNC system President Erskine Bowles said recently that legislative leaders  are willing to listen to alternate proposals.

If the General Assembly's edict holds, all tuition revenue raised would go into the state's general fund. If it decides next year to adopt a university tuition plan instead, revenue raised would be used for campus needs, and half of it would be set aside for financial aid.

Campus officials would very much like to keep that $200 that the General Assembly has targeted for the General Fund.

The increase for nonresident students has created some discontent, but campus and UNC-system leaders have long viewed those students differently than North Carolinians. Tuition for out-of-state students has often been set with market and competitiveness data used as guidelines.

Ryan Morgan, a UNC-CH student representing 5,000 other non-resident students, told trustees prior to Thursday's vote that the cost of an out-of-state education is forcing some students to withdraw.

"I myself am graduating one year early because I can't afford to stay here an additional year," said Morgan, who is from Alabama. "Out-of-state students are imperative to the quality of the university. What good is the best university in the country if you can't afford it?"

Read more on this issue in Friday's News & Observer.

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UNC-CH trustees okay tuition and fee hikes

The UNC sports teams are a student and taxpayer rip-off. Fire the coaches and UNC could lower its tuition and fees.

Out of state students

Build a better school in your home state. Don't expect to leach of the taxpayers in this state. My job is to pay for my kids school. Not a bunch of people from Knoxville, Denver, or Bamalama. Drop the attitude of entitlement already. That pisses me off more than anything. You are NOT entitled to my tax money. PERIOD. And the sooner the leaches on the public treasury figure this out the better.

About State support at UNC

cbrose: With all due respect, you may want to rethink your statement. At UNC, the state pays about 22 percent, though that may be cut by as much as 7 percent this year (Triangle Business Journal, May 22, 2009). In other words, the citzens of North Carolina do not pay nearly as much as you would think to operate UNC. Guess where the other 78% comes from? Well, a big chunk comes from Federal dollars, you know, those people from Knoxville, Denver, and the rest of the country.

UNC

I live in CH and I wouldn't mind seing them lay off some professors there. The taxpayers have funded UNC-CH for decades yet most of UNC sits in Ivory towers thumbing their nose or ridiculing the taxpayers (bumpkins, rednecks, whatever they call them next week) who have been footing the bill for them to have jobs that don't seem to actually involve any real work. (TA's, grad students and underpaid staff do most of the real heavy lifting.) The place is full of 6 figure administrators who duplicate each other's functions. The whole CH campus has become so elite that most taxpayers kids in NC won't be able to get in. I'm all in favor of kicking these pompus "educators" off the public teat and make them get their students to pay fully for there self important "research" and what not. They might think twice about their attitudes if they actually had to have a truely MARKETABLE skill... Instead of forcing tax payers and parents to subsidize all the baloney that goes on there.

Hee, Hee Funny

Always enough money to pay for Mary Easley's 180K /yr salary, 150K year for "VP and Directors" in the bloated UNC bureaucracy though.

The "Universities" in this state are just method to funnel state [and Federal] taxpayer money to teh Democrat Machine political cronies in every part of the state.

"I myself am graduating one year early because I can't afford to stay here an additional year," said Morgan, who is from Alabama. "Out-of-state students are imperative to the quality of the university. What good is the best university in the country if you can't afford it?"

Morgan from Alabama must really be Forrest Gump.
Best University- Hee, Hee, Hee, Hee ............

The UNC system at best is average.

Communist professors

My grandchildren will not be attending when they get to this age. You need to cut the pay of the useless professors who sit on their butts and turn our kids to communism.

Typically gutless

In this economic climate this is an unconscionable action on the part of our spineless legislators. Our "state supported" universities are well on their way to becoming private universities at least as far as out-of-state students are concerned. If this is a state supported system, provide appropriate support; don't put more costs on the backs of the students.

Lay offs, yes

We taxpayers would like you to lay off the social engineers and marxist propagandists that are not necessary in the education of students. That would save us a great deal of money and improve education, as well.

Government never cuts back!

The economy is tanking, yet UNC is just like the Post Office. When the Post Office loses customers, they RAISE the price of postage! Typical government mentality. How top heavy is the administration in the UNC system? Lay people off, just like the private sector is doing!

Gotta get those coaches

Gotta get those coaches their paychecks!

The corruption continues

I'd like to thank Mr Ferreri for pointing out the scam involved in siphoning tuition dollars into the General Fund - which, as others have pointed out, would be better-named as the Slush Fund.

Instead of this money going for scholarships, research, or faculty pay, we can count on it being used to fund the various vanity projects of Basnight, Rand, et al.

North Carolina, the new New Jersey. Or the next Louisiana.

Tuition money should stay at universities

It is outrageous that the General Assembly is using tuition increases as a source of general revenue. This is essentially a tax on students in order to support the state budget. Any tuition increase should be money that stays in the UNC system to help reverse the effect of budget cuts.

The UNC system has historically had a low proportion of out-of-state students compared to public universities in other states. For example, whereas UNC is around 20% out of state, UVa is around 35%. Out of state students are typically academically stronger than in-state students, since admission for out-of-state students is much more competitive.

I wonder...

I wonder, with this announcement that tuition must be raised, how much of a raise Butch Davis will get? When the team went 4-8 in 2007, and with the severe economic disaster we were in the midst of, UNC-CH gave him a raise of nearly $300k. Just from Davis's 2007 raise, approximately 50 in-state students could have had all of their fees and tuition paid for the next year.

So, raise tuition, zero out faculty salaries, and layoff faculty and staff. Then tell us that Butch Davis has a winning record and so you will give him a raise of what, $500k, $1 mil??

If salary is a measure of importance in a business enterprise, then the two most important people on UNC-CH's campus are Roy Williams and Butch Davis. Now, how did this happen?

Rams Club Benefits

These new tuition rates will increase the cost to the North Carolina taxpayer because of an increase in the gap between in-state and out of state tuition rates. This is because out of state academic and athletic scholarships in the UNC System are paid for at in state rates. The current cost to the North Carolina taxpayer is approximately twelve million dollars a year. We can all thank Senator Tony Rand (UNC supporter) and others for passing this law five or six years ago. We can guess which school benefits the most from this unfair law. And of course it adds to our budget deficit.

Shameful -- UNC trustees

Shameful -- UNC trustees again violate their responsibility to students and to the NC constitution.

Out of state students

Wow, that should keep the 100 or so of American citizens of illegal immigrarats out of college in the state of North Carolina!

In-state First!

(1) Preference should ALWAYS be in favor of in-state students. Yes, I appreciate the intrinsic contributions of the out-of-state students but "in-state" comes first.

(2) If the new $$$$ go into the state's "general fund" then all it is is graft for Basnight's corrupt machine.

(3) Academicians may be loony ..... but politicians are crooked. Support the loons more than the crooks.

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About the blogger

Eric Ferreri covers higher education and general news.
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